Consolidated state political party control and the enactment of obesity-related policies in the United States

Jennifer Pomeranz, Arjumand Siddiqi, Gabriella J. Bolanos, Jeremy A. Shor, Rita Hamad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

States play a key role in addressing obesity and its risk factors through policymaking, but there is variation in state activity nationally. The goal of this study was to examine whether the presence of a consolidated Democratic or Republican "trifecta" - when a state's governorship and both houses of the legislature are dominated by the same political party - or divided government (i.e., without a trifecta) is associated with obesity-related policy content and enactment. In 2016 and 2017, we gathered state bills and laws utilizing the CDC Chronic Disease State Policy Tracking System, and examined the association between state-level political party control and the enactment of state-level obesity-related policies in all states during 2009-2015. The three areas of interest included: policies specifically addressing obesity, nutrition, or physical activity in communities, schools, or workplaces using a public health framework; neutral policies, such as creating government task forces; and policies that employed a business-interest framework (e.g., Commonsense Consumption Acts that prohibit consumer lawsuits against restaurant establishments). Using divided governments as the reference group, we found that states with Democratic trifectas enacted significantly more laws, and more laws with a public health framework. Republican trifecta states enacted more laws related to physical activity, and in some states like Texas, Republican trifectas were exceptionally active in passing policies with a public health framework. States with Republican trifectas enacted a statistically similar amount of laws as states with divided governments. These findings suggest promise across states for obesity-related public health policymaking under a variety of political regimes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPreventive Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

Fingerprint

Obesity
Public Health
Restaurants
Advisory Committees
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Workplace
Chronic Disease

Keywords

  • Legislation
  • Nutrition
  • Obesity
  • Physical activity
  • Policy
  • State governments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Consolidated state political party control and the enactment of obesity-related policies in the United States. / Pomeranz, Jennifer; Siddiqi, Arjumand; Bolanos, Gabriella J.; Shor, Jeremy A.; Hamad, Rita.

In: Preventive Medicine, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{2b0984dab17a4e26ab9e58f4c9e36609,
title = "Consolidated state political party control and the enactment of obesity-related policies in the United States",
abstract = "States play a key role in addressing obesity and its risk factors through policymaking, but there is variation in state activity nationally. The goal of this study was to examine whether the presence of a consolidated Democratic or Republican {"}trifecta{"} - when a state's governorship and both houses of the legislature are dominated by the same political party - or divided government (i.e., without a trifecta) is associated with obesity-related policy content and enactment. In 2016 and 2017, we gathered state bills and laws utilizing the CDC Chronic Disease State Policy Tracking System, and examined the association between state-level political party control and the enactment of state-level obesity-related policies in all states during 2009-2015. The three areas of interest included: policies specifically addressing obesity, nutrition, or physical activity in communities, schools, or workplaces using a public health framework; neutral policies, such as creating government task forces; and policies that employed a business-interest framework (e.g., Commonsense Consumption Acts that prohibit consumer lawsuits against restaurant establishments). Using divided governments as the reference group, we found that states with Democratic trifectas enacted significantly more laws, and more laws with a public health framework. Republican trifecta states enacted more laws related to physical activity, and in some states like Texas, Republican trifectas were exceptionally active in passing policies with a public health framework. States with Republican trifectas enacted a statistically similar amount of laws as states with divided governments. These findings suggest promise across states for obesity-related public health policymaking under a variety of political regimes.",
keywords = "Legislation, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Policy, State governments",
author = "Jennifer Pomeranz and Arjumand Siddiqi and Bolanos, {Gabriella J.} and Shor, {Jeremy A.} and Rita Hamad",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.08.028",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Preventive Medicine",
issn = "0091-7435",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Consolidated state political party control and the enactment of obesity-related policies in the United States

AU - Pomeranz, Jennifer

AU - Siddiqi, Arjumand

AU - Bolanos, Gabriella J.

AU - Shor, Jeremy A.

AU - Hamad, Rita

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - States play a key role in addressing obesity and its risk factors through policymaking, but there is variation in state activity nationally. The goal of this study was to examine whether the presence of a consolidated Democratic or Republican "trifecta" - when a state's governorship and both houses of the legislature are dominated by the same political party - or divided government (i.e., without a trifecta) is associated with obesity-related policy content and enactment. In 2016 and 2017, we gathered state bills and laws utilizing the CDC Chronic Disease State Policy Tracking System, and examined the association between state-level political party control and the enactment of state-level obesity-related policies in all states during 2009-2015. The three areas of interest included: policies specifically addressing obesity, nutrition, or physical activity in communities, schools, or workplaces using a public health framework; neutral policies, such as creating government task forces; and policies that employed a business-interest framework (e.g., Commonsense Consumption Acts that prohibit consumer lawsuits against restaurant establishments). Using divided governments as the reference group, we found that states with Democratic trifectas enacted significantly more laws, and more laws with a public health framework. Republican trifecta states enacted more laws related to physical activity, and in some states like Texas, Republican trifectas were exceptionally active in passing policies with a public health framework. States with Republican trifectas enacted a statistically similar amount of laws as states with divided governments. These findings suggest promise across states for obesity-related public health policymaking under a variety of political regimes.

AB - States play a key role in addressing obesity and its risk factors through policymaking, but there is variation in state activity nationally. The goal of this study was to examine whether the presence of a consolidated Democratic or Republican "trifecta" - when a state's governorship and both houses of the legislature are dominated by the same political party - or divided government (i.e., without a trifecta) is associated with obesity-related policy content and enactment. In 2016 and 2017, we gathered state bills and laws utilizing the CDC Chronic Disease State Policy Tracking System, and examined the association between state-level political party control and the enactment of state-level obesity-related policies in all states during 2009-2015. The three areas of interest included: policies specifically addressing obesity, nutrition, or physical activity in communities, schools, or workplaces using a public health framework; neutral policies, such as creating government task forces; and policies that employed a business-interest framework (e.g., Commonsense Consumption Acts that prohibit consumer lawsuits against restaurant establishments). Using divided governments as the reference group, we found that states with Democratic trifectas enacted significantly more laws, and more laws with a public health framework. Republican trifecta states enacted more laws related to physical activity, and in some states like Texas, Republican trifectas were exceptionally active in passing policies with a public health framework. States with Republican trifectas enacted a statistically similar amount of laws as states with divided governments. These findings suggest promise across states for obesity-related public health policymaking under a variety of political regimes.

KW - Legislation

KW - Nutrition

KW - Obesity

KW - Physical activity

KW - Policy

KW - State governments

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85030474252&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85030474252&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.08.028

DO - 10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.08.028

M3 - Article

C2 - 28865810

AN - SCOPUS:85030474252

JO - Preventive Medicine

JF - Preventive Medicine

SN - 0091-7435

ER -