Controlling the body orientation of C. elegans by exploiting its proprioception in a microfluidic confinement for body wall muscle imaging

Samuel Sofela, Sarah Sahloul, Sukanta Bhattacharjee, Yong Ak Song

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Controlling the body orientation of C. elegans for imaging on widely used agarose pad is a challenging task requiring laborious manual manipulation. Here, we report a microfluidic device to control its body orientation for fluorescence imaging of its body wall muscles. Our device takes advantage of the innate proprioception of the worm to rotate its body in a channel with an aspect ratio over 1 in order to obtain maximum free space for its body undulation motion. Exploiting this feature, we observed a significant decrease in the mitochondrial fluorescence intensity under hyperglycemic conditions not discernible with the agarose pad.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMicroTAS 2020 - 24th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences
PublisherChemical and Biological Microsystems Society
Pages903-904
Number of pages2
ISBN (Electronic)9781733419017
StatePublished - 2020
Event24th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2020 - Virtual, Online
Duration: Oct 4 2020Oct 9 2020

Publication series

NameMicroTAS 2020 - 24th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences

Conference

Conference24th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2020
CityVirtual, Online
Period10/4/2010/9/20

Keywords

  • Body imaging
  • Body wall muscle
  • C. elegans
  • Hyperglycemia
  • Proprioception

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering (miscellaneous)
  • Bioengineering
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Control and Systems Engineering

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Controlling the body orientation of C. elegans by exploiting its proprioception in a microfluidic confinement for body wall muscle imaging'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this