Correlates of isolated nocturnal hypertension and target organ damage in a population-based cohort of african americans: The jackson heart study

Gbenga Ogedegbe, Tanya M. Spruill, Daniel F. Sarpong, Charles Agyemang, William Chaplin, Amy Pastva, David Martins, Joseph Ravenell, Thomas G. Pickering

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

background African Americans have higher rates of nocturnal hypertension and less nocturnal blood pressure (BP) dipping compared with whites. Although nocturnal hypertension is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, its clinical significance among those with normal daytime BP is unclear. This paper reports the prevalence and correlates of isolated nocturnal hypertension (INH) in a population-based cohort of African Americans enrolled in the Jackson Heart Study (JHS). methods The study sample included 425 untreated, normotensive and hypertensive JHS participants who underwent 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM), echocardiography, and 24-hour urine collection. Multiple logistic regression and 1-way analysis of variance models were used to test the hypothesis that those with INH have worse target organ damage reflected by greater left ventricular (LV) mass and proteinuria compared with normotensive participants. results Based on 24-hour ABP profiles, 19.1% of participants had INH. In age and sex-adjusted models, participants with INH had greater LV mass compared with those who were normotensive (P = 0.02), as well as about 3 times the odds of LV hypertrophy and proteinuria (Ps > 0.10). However, multivariable adjustment reduced the magnitude and statistical significance of each of these differences. conclusions INH was associated with increased LV mass compared with normotension in a population-based cohort of African Americans enrolled in the JHS. There were trends toward a greater likelihood of LV hypertrophy and proteinuria among participants with INH vs. those who were normotensive. The clinical significance of the noted target organ damage should be explored in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1011-1016
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Hypertension
Volume26
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2013

Keywords

  • Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring
  • Blood pressure
  • Hypertension
  • Jackson Heart Study
  • Nocturnal blood pressure
  • Target organ damage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Correlates of isolated nocturnal hypertension and target organ damage in a population-based cohort of african americans: The jackson heart study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Ogedegbe, G., Spruill, T. M., Sarpong, D. F., Agyemang, C., Chaplin, W., Pastva, A., Martins, D., Ravenell, J., & Pickering, T. G. (2013). Correlates of isolated nocturnal hypertension and target organ damage in a population-based cohort of african americans: The jackson heart study. American Journal of Hypertension, 26(8), 1011-1016. https://doi.org/10.1093/ajh/hpt064