COVID-19 outcomes in hospitalized patients with active cancer: Experiences from a major New York City health care system

Chen Fu, James H. Stoeckle, Lena Masri, Abhishek Pandey, Meng Cao, Dalia Littman, Marissa Rybstein, Sunil E. Saith, Kinan Yarta, Abhinav Rohatgi, Danil V. Makarov, Scott E. Sherman, Christy Morrissey, Alexander C. Jordan, Beatrice Razzo, Poy Theprungsirikul, Joseph Tsai, Daniel J. Becker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The authors sought to study the risk factors associated with severe outcomes in hospitalized coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients with cancer. Methods: The authors queried the New York University Langone Medical Center's records for hospitalized patients who were polymerase chain reaction–positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS CoV-2) and performed chart reviews on patients with cancer diagnoses to identify patients with active cancer and patients with a history of cancer. Descriptive statistics were calculated and multivariable logistic regression was used to determine associations between clinical, demographic, and laboratory characteristics with outcomes, including death and admission to the intensive care unit. Results: A total of 4184 hospitalized SARS CoV-2+ patients, including 233 with active cancer, were identified. Patients with active cancer were more likely to die than those with a history of cancer and those without any cancer history (34.3% vs 27.6% vs 20%, respectively; P <.01). In multivariable regression among all patients, active cancer (odds ratio [OR], 1.89; CI, 1.34-2.67; P <.01), older age (OR, 1.06; CI, 1.05-1.06; P <.01), male sex (OR for female vs male, 0.70; CI, 0.58-0.84; P <.01), diabetes (OR, 1.26; CI, 1.04-1.53; P =.02), morbidly obese body mass index (OR, 1.87; CI, 1.24-2.81; P <.01), and elevated D-dimer (OR, 6.41 for value >2300; CI, 4.75-8.66; P <.01) were associated with increased mortality. Recent cancer-directed medical therapy was not associated with death in multivariable analysis. Among patients with active cancer, those with a hematologic malignancy had the highest mortality rate in comparison with other cancer types (47.83% vs 28.66%; P <.01). Conclusions: The authors found that patients with an active cancer diagnosis were more likely to die from COVID-19. Those with hematologic malignancies were at the highest risk of death. Patients receiving cancer-directed therapy within 3 months before hospitalization had no overall increased risk of death. Lay Summary: Our investigators found that hospitalized patients with active cancer were more likely to die from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) than those with a history of cancer and those without any cancer history. Patients with hematologic cancers were the most likely among patients with cancer to die from COVID-19. Patients who received cancer therapy within 3 months before hospitalization did not have an increased risk of death.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3466-3475
Number of pages10
JournalCancer
Volume127
Issue number18
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 15 2021

Keywords

  • New York City
  • active
  • cancer
  • chemotherapy
  • coronavirus
  • coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)
  • hospitalized
  • outcomes
  • risk

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'COVID-19 outcomes in hospitalized patients with active cancer: Experiences from a major New York City health care system'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this