Cue-dependent interference in comprehension

Julie A. Van Dyke, Brian McElree

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The role of interference as a primary determinant of forgetting in memory has long been accepted, however its role as a contributor to poor comprehension is just beginning to be understood. The current paper reports two studies, in which speed-accuracy tradeoff and eye-tracking methodologies were used with the same materials to provide converging evidence for the role of syntactic and semantic cues as mediators of both proactive (PI) and retroactive interference (RI) during comprehension. Consistent with previous work (e.g., Van Dyke & Lewis, 2003), we found that syntactic constraints at the retrieval site are among the cues that drive retrieval in comprehension, and that these constraints effectively limit interference from potential distractors with semantic/pragmatic properties in common with the target constituent. The data are discussed in terms of a cue-overload account, in which interference both arises from and is mediated through a direct-access retrieval mechanism that utilizes a linear, weighted cue-combinatoric scheme.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)247-263
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Memory and Language
Volume65
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2011

Keywords

  • Comprehension
  • Retrieval interference
  • Sentence processing
  • Speed-accuracy tradeoff

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Artificial Intelligence

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