Cultural, gender, and psychosocial influences on HIV-related behavior of African-American female adolescents: implications for the development of tailored prevention programs.

G. M. Wingood, R. J. DiClemente

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

This paper presents epidemiologic data describing the risk of HIV/AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases for African-American female adolescents relative to their white peers. Diverse cultural, psychosocial, and gender influences affect behavior; these should be considered in the development and implementation of culturally sensitive HIV prevention interventions tailored toward African-American female adolescents. These influences include sex-role socialization issues, the African-American family; issues related to racial identity; communication styles common among African-American youth; normative influences in adolescent heterosexual relationships; and factors affecting feelings of self-efficacy, empowerment, and gender rules in the African-American female adolescent. Strategies for incorporating cultural, psychosocial, and gender influences into the development of HIV risk-reduction interventions are suggested. Culturally specific interventions tailored toward this population may be more effective at motivating the adoption and maintenance of HIV-preventive behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)381-388
Number of pages8
JournalEthnicity & disease
Volume2
Issue number4
StatePublished - Sep 1992

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Cultural, gender, and psychosocial influences on HIV-related behavior of African-American female adolescents: implications for the development of tailored prevention programs.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this