Culture and the process of person perception: Evidence for automaticity among East Asians in correcting for situational influences on behavior

Eric D. Knowles, Michael W. Morris, Chi Yue Chiu, Ying Yi Hong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The authors evaluate three models of the cognitive processes underlying person perception (i.e., the processes perceivers use to judge whether an actor's behavior reflects a personal disposition), each of which implies a different way in which culturally instilled lay theories of behavior affect attributions. The models make distinctive predictions concerning how cognitive busyness will affect dispositional inference among members of different cultures. To test the models, the authors compared attributions of U.S. and Hong Kong perceiversfor an expressive act under conditions of high and low cognitive busyness. Whereas cognitive busyness increased dispositionism among U.S. participants, it did not for Hong Kong participants. Findings from numerous measures combine to support the automatized situational correction model, which posits that holders of a situation-based lay theory of behavior (such as members of Chinese culture) have automatized the ability to correct attributions to personal dispositions to take into account situational influences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1344-1356
Number of pages13
JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Volume27
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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