Decomposing total IR spectra of aqueous systems into solute and solvent contributions: A computational approach using maximally localized Wannier orbitals

Radu Iftimie, Mark E. Tuckerman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The theoretical principles underpinning the calculation of infrared spectra for condensed-phase systems in the context of ab initio molecular dynamics have been recently developed in literature. At present, most ab initio molecular dynamics calculations are restricted to relatively small systems and short simulation times. In this paper we devise a method that allows well-converged results for infrared spectra from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations using small systems and short trajectories characteristic of simulations typically performed in practice. We demonstrate the utility of our approach by computing the imaginary part of the dielectric constant ε″ (ω) for H2 O and D2 O in solid and liquid phases and show that it compares well with experimental data. We further demonstrate that maximally localized Wannier orbitals can be used to separate the individual contributions of different molecular species to the linear spectrum of complex systems. The new spectral decomposition method is shown to be useful in present-day ab initio molecular dynamics calculations to compute the magnitude of the "continuous absorption" generated by excess protons in aqueous solutions with good accuracy even when other species present in the solutions absorb strongly in the same frequency window.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number214508
JournalJournal of Chemical Physics
Volume122
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

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