Deprivation and threat as developmental mediators in the relation between early life socioeconomic status and executive functioning outcomes in early childhood

Sarah C. Vogel, Rosemarie E. Perry, Annie Brandes-Aitken, Stephen Braren, Clancy Blair

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

There has been a shift in the study of childhood adversity towards a focus on dimensions of adversity as opposed to a focus on cumulative risk or specific adversities. The Dimensional Model of Adversity and Psychopathology (DMAP) proposes deprivation and threat as core dimensions of childhood adversity. Previous work using DMAP has found links between deprivation and cognitive development and threat and emotional development in adolescence, but few studies have applied this framework to a poverty context, in which children are at heightened risk for adversity experiences, and none have examined outcomes in early childhood. We use data from the Family Life Project (n = 1292) to examine deprivation and threat at child age 24 months as developmental mediators in the association between socioeconomic status (SES) measured at 15 months and executive functions (EF) measured at 48 months. In a multiple mediation model, lower SES was related to higher deprivation and threat. Deprivation was negatively associated with EF, and threat was not associated with EF. Deprivation fully mediated association between SES and EF. These results expand previous work using the DMAP and point to new directions in understanding children's cognitive adaptations to adversity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number100907
JournalDevelopmental Cognitive Neuroscience
Volume47
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2021

Keywords

  • Childhood adversity
  • Cognitive adaptations
  • Deprivation
  • Executive functions
  • Threat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Deprivation and threat as developmental mediators in the relation between early life socioeconomic status and executive functioning outcomes in early childhood'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this