Differences between African-American adolescent females with and without human papillomavirus infection

Puja Seth, Gina M. Wingood, Ralph J. Diclemente, Richard A. Crosby, Laura F. Salazar, Eve S. Rose, Jessica M. Sales

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: An important policy question is whether high-risk populations can be identified and prioritised for human papillomavirus (HPV) immunisation. Methods: Data collection included an audio computer-assisted survey interview and testing of Trichomonas vaginalis, Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and HPV among 295 African-American adolescent females. Results: The results indicated that 43.1% tested positive for HPV. Logistic regression analyses indicated that HPV prevalence was not associated with other sexually transmissible infections (prevalence ratio (PR)=0.85, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.51-1.41), unprotected vaginal sex (PR=1.04, 95% CI=0.56-1.92), having sex with an older male partner (PR=1.12, 95% CI=0.64-1.96), and having a casual partner (PR=0.89, 95% CI=0.54-1.48). Additionally, t-tests indicated that HPV prevalence was not associated with frequency of vaginal sex (t=0.17, P=0.87), protected sex (t=0.16, P=0.87), number of recent (t=0.40, P=0.69) or lifetime (t=1.45, P=0.15) sexual partners. However, those testing positive for HPV were younger (t=1.97, P=0.05) and reported current use of birth control pills (PR=2.38, 95% CI=1.00-5.63). Conclusions: It may not be possible to identify those with elevated risk of HPV acquisition. Thus, HPV vaccination, regardless of risk indicators, may be the most efficacious public health strategy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)125-127
Number of pages3
JournalSexual Health
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011

Keywords

  • African-American
  • adolescents
  • human papillomavirus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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    Seth, P., Wingood, G. M., Diclemente, R. J., Crosby, R. A., Salazar, L. F., Rose, E. S., & Sales, J. M. (2011). Differences between African-American adolescent females with and without human papillomavirus infection. Sexual Health, 8(1), 125-127. https://doi.org/10.1071/SH10107