Disparities in Sources of Added Sugars and High Glycemic Index Foods in Diets of US Children, 2011-2016

Rienna G. Russo, Brandilyn A. Peters, Vanessa Salcedo, Vivian Hc Wang, Simona C. Kwon, Bei Wu, Stella Yi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Added sugars and high glycemic index (GI) foods might play a role in cardiometabolic pathogenesis. Our study aimed to describe the top sources of added sugars and types of high GI foods in diets of children by race/ethnicity. METHODS: We examined data for 3,112 children, aged 6 to 11 years from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2011 to 2016. Mean intake was estimated and linear regression models tested for differences by race/ethnicity. Population proportions for food sources were created and ranked, accounting for survey weighting when appropriate. RESULTS: Asian American and Mexican American children had the lowest reported added sugar intake. Cereals were observed to contribute highly to added sugar intake. Soft drinks did not contribute as much added sugar intake for Asian American children as it did for children of other races/ethnicities. Asian American children consumed significantly more high GI foods than other groups. Types of high GI foods differed meaningfully across racial/ethnic groups (ie, Mexican American: burritos/tacos; other Hispanic, White, and Black: pizza; Asian American: rice). Rice accounted for 37% of total high GI foods consumed by Asian American children. CONCLUSIONS: Sources of added sugars and types of high GI foods in children's diets vary across racial/ethnic groups. Targeting foods identified as top sources of added sugars for all race/ethnicities and focusing on substitution of whole grains may reduce obesity, diabetes, and related cardiometabolic risk more equitably.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E139
JournalPreventing Chronic Disease
Volume17
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 5 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Disparities in Sources of Added Sugars and High Glycemic Index Foods in Diets of US Children, 2011-2016'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this