Disruptions in Care and Support for Homebound Adults in Home-Based Primary Care in New York City During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Alex D. Federman, Bruce Leff, Abraham A. Brody, Sara Lubetsky, Albert L. Siu, Christine S. Ritchie, Katherine A. Ornstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Homebound older adults are a highly vulnerable population, yet little is known about their experiences with healthcare during the COVID-19 pandemic. We interviewed patients in home-based primary care (HBPC) in New York City by telephone in May and June of 2020. Interviews covered social supports, household activities, self-care, and medical care, and asked participants to compare current with prepandemic experiences. Among 70 participants, 37% were Black and 32% were Hispanic. Disruptions in the home included greater difficulty accessing paid caregivers (13.9%) and food (35.3%) than before the pandemic, and unaddressed household chores (laundry, 81.4%; food preparation, 11.4%). Black study participants were more likely than White and Hispanic participants to report disruptions in accessing medical care (13 [50.0%] vs. 3 [14.3%] vs. 6 [27.3%], respectively, p = 0.02), as well as food preparation and medication taking. Black patients in HBPC are at risk of disparities in healthcare and social support during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)211-214
Number of pages4
JournalHome Healthcare Now
Volume39
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Community and Home Care
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Disruptions in Care and Support for Homebound Adults in Home-Based Primary Care in New York City During the COVID-19 Pandemic'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this