Do child-rearing values in Taiwan and the United States reflect cultural values of collectivism and individualism?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Eighty-one middle-class mothers of 3- and 4-year-old children from urban cities in Taiwan and the United States were interviewed about their child-rearing values. Three methods were used to assess values: open-ended probes, Likert-type ratings, and ordering of values according to importance. Child-rearing values could be grouped into five broad categories: individuality, achievement, proper demeanor, decency, and connectedness. U.S. mothers' child-rearing values were somewhat consistent with an individualistic orientation, yet they considered values associated with connectedness to be most important. Taiwanese mothers' child-rearing values were less focused on any specific category. Findings from the three methods suggest that child-rearing values in Taiwan and the United States cannot be dichotomized as collectivist or individualist. Mothers in the two societies embraced both individualist and collectivist values.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)629-642
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Cross-Cultural Psychology
Volume34
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2003

Keywords

  • Child-rearing values
  • Collectivism
  • Individualism
  • Taiwan

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Cultural Studies
  • Anthropology

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