Do small high schools affect rates of risky health behaviors and poor mental health among low-income teenagers? Evidence from New York city

Kai Hong, Syeda Sana Fatima, Amy Ellen Schwartz, Leanna Stiefel, Sherry Glied

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We evaluate the impacts of small high schools on youth risky behaviors and mental health in New York City, using a two-sample-instrumental-variable approach to address endogenous school enrollment. We find heterogeneous effects. School size, overall, has little effect. Among students most likely to attend small schools opened after an educational-achievement-oriented reform, however, diagnoses of violence-associated injuries and mental health disorders increased. Among students most likely to attend traditional small schools opened prior to the reform, pregnancy rates and diagnoses of mental health disorders declined. School focus is more important than school size as a determinant of student well-being outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalEducation Economics
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2023

Keywords

  • H41
  • I12
  • I21
  • J13
  • Small high school
  • instrumental variable
  • mental health
  • youth pregnancy
  • youth violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Economics and Econometrics

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Do small high schools affect rates of risky health behaviors and poor mental health among low-income teenagers? Evidence from New York city'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this