Does early executive function predict teacher-child relationships from kindergarten to second grade?

The Family Life Project Investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Teacher- child relationships have been linked to children's classroom engagement and to academic achievement. However, researchers have paid minimal attention to individual child factors that predict the development of these relationships. In the current study, we examined executive function (EF) prior to school entry as a predictor of teacher- child relationships at kindergarten through second grade. We also examined externalizing behavior problems, verbal intelligence, and academic achievement as mediators of these associations. Data were from the Family Life Project, a prospective, longitudinal sample of N = 1,292 families from predominantly low-socioeconomic status (SES) and rural communities in Pennsylvania and North Carolina. Children were administered a multidimensional battery of EF when they were 48 months old and standardized measures of verbal intelligence and academic achievement at prekindergarten. Parents reported on externalizing behavior problems when children were 60 months old. Kindergarten, first-, and second-grade teachers reported on teacher- child relationships. Growth curve models revealed that EF at 48 months positively predicted closeness and negatively predicted conflict with teachers in kindergarten but not change in closeness or conflict over time. Verbal intelligence mediated the associations between EF and both closeness and conflict. EF continued to significantly predict conflict, but not closeness, with kindergarten teachers when the mediator was included in the model. The results of this study are discussed in the context of the implications of children's self-regulation for classroom engagement in a low-SES sample.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2053-2066
Number of pages14
JournalDevelopmental Psychology
Volume54
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018

Fingerprint

Executive Function
kindergarten
school grade
teacher
Intelligence
academic achievement
intelligence
Social Class
social status
Verbal Behavior
kindergarten teacher
classroom
Rural Population
self-regulation
rural community
parents
Parents
Research Personnel
Conflict (Psychology)
Growth

Keywords

  • Early elementary grades
  • Executive function
  • Growth curve model
  • Teacher- child relationship

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

Does early executive function predict teacher-child relationships from kindergarten to second grade? / The Family Life Project Investigators.

In: Developmental Psychology, Vol. 54, No. 11, 01.11.2018, p. 2053-2066.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

The Family Life Project Investigators. / Does early executive function predict teacher-child relationships from kindergarten to second grade?. In: Developmental Psychology. 2018 ; Vol. 54, No. 11. pp. 2053-2066.
@article{a320101b5da1418c849626318e11b3c7,
title = "Does early executive function predict teacher-child relationships from kindergarten to second grade?",
abstract = "Teacher- child relationships have been linked to children's classroom engagement and to academic achievement. However, researchers have paid minimal attention to individual child factors that predict the development of these relationships. In the current study, we examined executive function (EF) prior to school entry as a predictor of teacher- child relationships at kindergarten through second grade. We also examined externalizing behavior problems, verbal intelligence, and academic achievement as mediators of these associations. Data were from the Family Life Project, a prospective, longitudinal sample of N = 1,292 families from predominantly low-socioeconomic status (SES) and rural communities in Pennsylvania and North Carolina. Children were administered a multidimensional battery of EF when they were 48 months old and standardized measures of verbal intelligence and academic achievement at prekindergarten. Parents reported on externalizing behavior problems when children were 60 months old. Kindergarten, first-, and second-grade teachers reported on teacher- child relationships. Growth curve models revealed that EF at 48 months positively predicted closeness and negatively predicted conflict with teachers in kindergarten but not change in closeness or conflict over time. Verbal intelligence mediated the associations between EF and both closeness and conflict. EF continued to significantly predict conflict, but not closeness, with kindergarten teachers when the mediator was included in the model. The results of this study are discussed in the context of the implications of children's self-regulation for classroom engagement in a low-SES sample.",
keywords = "Early elementary grades, Executive function, Growth curve model, Teacher- child relationship",
author = "{The Family Life Project Investigators} and McKinnon, {Rachel D.} and Clancy Blair and Lynne Vernon-Feagans and Mark Greenberg and Martha Cox and Clancy Blair and Peg Burchinal and Michael Willoughby and Patricia Garrett-Peters and Roger Mills-Koonce and Maureen Ittig",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1037/dev0000584",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "54",
pages = "2053--2066",
journal = "Developmental Psychology",
issn = "0012-1649",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does early executive function predict teacher-child relationships from kindergarten to second grade?

AU - The Family Life Project Investigators

AU - McKinnon, Rachel D.

AU - Blair, Clancy

AU - Vernon-Feagans, Lynne

AU - Greenberg, Mark

AU - Cox, Martha

AU - Blair, Clancy

AU - Burchinal, Peg

AU - Willoughby, Michael

AU - Garrett-Peters, Patricia

AU - Mills-Koonce, Roger

AU - Ittig, Maureen

PY - 2018/11/1

Y1 - 2018/11/1

N2 - Teacher- child relationships have been linked to children's classroom engagement and to academic achievement. However, researchers have paid minimal attention to individual child factors that predict the development of these relationships. In the current study, we examined executive function (EF) prior to school entry as a predictor of teacher- child relationships at kindergarten through second grade. We also examined externalizing behavior problems, verbal intelligence, and academic achievement as mediators of these associations. Data were from the Family Life Project, a prospective, longitudinal sample of N = 1,292 families from predominantly low-socioeconomic status (SES) and rural communities in Pennsylvania and North Carolina. Children were administered a multidimensional battery of EF when they were 48 months old and standardized measures of verbal intelligence and academic achievement at prekindergarten. Parents reported on externalizing behavior problems when children were 60 months old. Kindergarten, first-, and second-grade teachers reported on teacher- child relationships. Growth curve models revealed that EF at 48 months positively predicted closeness and negatively predicted conflict with teachers in kindergarten but not change in closeness or conflict over time. Verbal intelligence mediated the associations between EF and both closeness and conflict. EF continued to significantly predict conflict, but not closeness, with kindergarten teachers when the mediator was included in the model. The results of this study are discussed in the context of the implications of children's self-regulation for classroom engagement in a low-SES sample.

AB - Teacher- child relationships have been linked to children's classroom engagement and to academic achievement. However, researchers have paid minimal attention to individual child factors that predict the development of these relationships. In the current study, we examined executive function (EF) prior to school entry as a predictor of teacher- child relationships at kindergarten through second grade. We also examined externalizing behavior problems, verbal intelligence, and academic achievement as mediators of these associations. Data were from the Family Life Project, a prospective, longitudinal sample of N = 1,292 families from predominantly low-socioeconomic status (SES) and rural communities in Pennsylvania and North Carolina. Children were administered a multidimensional battery of EF when they were 48 months old and standardized measures of verbal intelligence and academic achievement at prekindergarten. Parents reported on externalizing behavior problems when children were 60 months old. Kindergarten, first-, and second-grade teachers reported on teacher- child relationships. Growth curve models revealed that EF at 48 months positively predicted closeness and negatively predicted conflict with teachers in kindergarten but not change in closeness or conflict over time. Verbal intelligence mediated the associations between EF and both closeness and conflict. EF continued to significantly predict conflict, but not closeness, with kindergarten teachers when the mediator was included in the model. The results of this study are discussed in the context of the implications of children's self-regulation for classroom engagement in a low-SES sample.

KW - Early elementary grades

KW - Executive function

KW - Growth curve model

KW - Teacher- child relationship

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85053075106&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85053075106&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037/dev0000584

DO - 10.1037/dev0000584

M3 - Article

C2 - 30211568

AN - SCOPUS:85053075106

VL - 54

SP - 2053

EP - 2066

JO - Developmental Psychology

JF - Developmental Psychology

SN - 0012-1649

IS - 11

ER -