Does the noise matter? Effects of different kinematogram types on smooth pursuit eye movements and perception

Alexander C. Schütz, Doris I. Braun, J. Anthony Movshon, Karl R. Gegenfurtner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We investigated how the human visual system and the pursuit system react to visual motion noise. We presented three different types of random-dot kinematograms at five different coherence levels. For transparent motion, the signal and noise labels on each dot were preserved throughout each trial, and noise dots moved with the same speed as the signal dots but in fixed random directions. For white noise motion, every 20 ms the signal and noise labels were randomly assigned to each dot and noise dots appeared at random positions. For Brownian motion, signal and noise labels were also randomly assigned, but the noise dots moved at the signal speed in a direction that varied randomly from moment to moment. Neither pursuit latency nor early eye acceleration differed among the different types of kinematograms. Late acceleration, pursuit gain, and perceived speed all depended on kinematogram type, with good agreement between pursuit gain and perceived speed. For transparent motion, pursuit gain and perceived speed were independent of coherence level. For white and Brownian motions, pursuit gain and perceived speed increased with coherence but were higher for white than for Brownian motion. This suggests that under our conditions, the pursuit system integrates across all directions of motion but not across all speeds.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-22
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of vision
Volume10
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

Keywords

  • Motion coherence
  • Motion integration
  • Motion perception
  • Motion segmentation
  • Motion transparency
  • Random-dot kinematogram
  • Smooth pursuit

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems

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