Early events associated with periodontal connective tissue attachment formation on titanium and hydroxyapatite surfaces

R. G. Craig, R. Z. LeGeros

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Endosseous dental implants can support at least three types of biomaterial/connective tissue interfaces: osseointegration, fibro-osseous integration, and periodontal connective tissue attachment. Although a periodontal connective tissue attachment offers distinct advantages, only osseointegration and fibro-osseous integration are at present clinically achievable. Recent studies indicate a periodontal regeneration-competent cell population and an appropriate biomaterial substrate both are required for periodontal connective attachment formation on biomaterial surfaces. We therefore have developed an in vitro model to characterize the effects of various biomaterial substrates on the early events of periodontal connective tissue attachment formation. Primary cultures of periodontal ligament and gingival connective tissue cells were cultured on uncoated (control) and coated (titanium- and hydroxyapatite-coated) tissue culture plastic, and the level of cell proliferation, collagen, and noncollagen protein synthesis, alkaline phosphatase activity, and expression of a 42 kD cementum extracellular matrix protein were measured over 5, 7, and 9 days in culture. While all three substrates supported cell attachment, proliferation, and protein synthesis, only uncoated and titanium-coated tissue culture plastic supported expression of the cementum extracellular matrix protein after 9 days of culture. In addition, the levels of cell proliferation and collagen and noncollagen protein synthesis for cells grown on hydroxyapatite-coated surfaces lagged behind cells cultured on the control or titanium-coated surfaces at each of the three time points. These data suggest that biomaterial substrates markedly can influence the temporal sequence of extracellular matrix proteins associated with periodontal connective tissue attachment formation. In addition to surface composition (titanium versus hydroxyapatite), surface properties (e.g., topography) also may have an effect on periodontal connective tissue attachment formation. This model may be of use in designing biomaterials to support the formation of periodontal connective tissue attachment in vivo.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)585-594
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Biomedical Materials Research
Volume47
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999

Keywords

  • Cementum
  • Collagen synthesis
  • Hydroxyapatite
  • Periodontal connective tissues
  • Titanium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering

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