Effective behavior of polycrystals that undergo martensitic phase transformation

Kaushik Bhattacharya, Robert V. Kohn

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The shape-memory effect is the ability of a material to recover, on heating, apparently plastic deformations that it suffers below a critical temperature. These apparently plastic strains are not caused by slip or dislocation, but by deformation twinning and the formation of other coherent microstructures by the symmetry-related variants of martensite. In single crystals, these strains depend on the transformation strain and can be quite large. However, in polycrystals made up of a large number of randomly oriented grains, the various grains may not deform cooperatively. Consequently, these recoverable strains depend on the texture and may be severely reduced or even eliminated. Thus, the shape-memory behavior of polycrystals may be significantly different from that of a single crystal. We address this issue by studying some model problems in the setting of anti-plane shear.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
PublisherPubl by Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers
Pages207-213
Number of pages7
ISBN (Print)0819411523
StatePublished - 1993
EventSmart Structures and Materials 1993: Mathematics in Smart Structures - Albuquerque, NM, USA
Duration: Feb 1 1993Feb 3 1993

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume1919
ISSN (Print)0277-786X

Other

OtherSmart Structures and Materials 1993: Mathematics in Smart Structures
CityAlbuquerque, NM, USA
Period2/1/932/3/93

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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  • Cite this

    Bhattacharya, K., & Kohn, R. V. (1993). Effective behavior of polycrystals that undergo martensitic phase transformation. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (pp. 207-213). (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering; Vol. 1919). Publ by Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.