Effects of ZDV-based patient education on intentions toward ZDV use, HIV testing and reproduction among a US cohort of women

Cheryl Healton, S. Taylor, P. Messeri, G. Weinberg, M. Bamji

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examined the immediate effects of exposure to a patient education brochure concerning the risks and benefits of zidovudine (ZDV) therapy during pregnancy to reduce perinatal HIV transmission (protocol ACTG 076) on related knowledge, behavioural intentions and attitudes of women with and at-risk for HIV-infection. Self-reports were collected from 653 women of childbearing age from community family planning clinics and hospital-based HIV centres in 19 sites from nine US cities between May and November 1995. The intervention was a nine-page patient education brochure in Spanish, Creole and English versions, evenly presenting the pros and cons of ZDV therapy to reduce perinatal HIV-transmission. Brochure exposure increased knowledge (P < 0.001) for all but one scale concerning ZDV resistance and increased the likelihood of women reporting intentions to take ZDV during pregnancy (p < 0.001) and to believe ZDV reduced transmission (p < 0.001). Brochure exposure had differential effects for some subpopulations. Intentions to have or terminate current or future pregnancies, knowledge about ZDV and attitudes toward ZDV varied mostly by ethnicity/race, language preference and HIV status. Pregnancy status, age, education and having an HIV-positive child had less impact on the brochure's effect, while income had no impact.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)675-686
Number of pages12
JournalAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
Volume11
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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