Efficacy of an HIV/STI Sexual Risk-Reduction Intervention for African American Adolescent Girls in Juvenile Detention Centers: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Ralph J. DiClemente, Teaniese L. Davis, Andrea Swartzendruber, Amy M. Fasula, Lorin Boyce, Deborah Gelaude, Simone C. Gray, James Hardin, Eve Rose, Monique Carry, Jessica M. Sales, Jennifer L. Brown, Michelle Staples-Horne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Few HIV/STI interventions exist for African American adolescent girls in juvenile detention. The objective was to evaluate the efficacy of an intervention to reduce incident STIs, improve HIV-preventive behaviors, and enhance psychosocial outcomes. We conducted a randomized controlled trial among African American adolescent girls (13–17 years, N = 188) in juvenile detention from March 2011 to May 2012. Assessments occurred at baseline and 3- and 6-months post-randomization and included: audio computer-assisted self-interview, condom skills assessment, and self-collected vaginal swab to detect Chlamydia and gonorrhea. The Imara intervention included three individual-level sessions and four phone sessions; expedited partner therapy was offered to STI-positive adolescents. The comparison group received the usual care provided by the detention center: STI testing, treatment, and counseling. At the 6-month assessment (3-months post-intervention), Imara participants reported higher condom use self-efficacy (p < 0.001), HIV/STI knowledge (p < 0.001), and condom use skills (p < 0.001) compared to control participants. No significant differences were observed between trial conditions in incident Chlamydia or gonorrhea infections, condom use, or number of vaginal sex partners. Imara for detained African American adolescent girls can improve condom use skills and psychosocial outcomes; however, a critical need for interventions to reduce sexual risk remains.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)726-749
Number of pages24
JournalWomen and Health
Volume54
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 15 2014

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • HIV
  • adolescents
  • intervention
  • juvenile detention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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