Electronic cigarette use among US adults in the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study, 2013–2014

Blair N. Coleman, Brian Rostron, Sarah E. Johnson, Bridget K. Ambrose, Jennifer Pearson, Cassandra A. Stanton, Baoguang Wang, Cristine Delnevo, Maansi Bansal-Travers, Heather L. Kimmel, Maciej L. Goniewicz, Raymond Niaura, David Abrams, Kevin P. Conway, Nicolette Borek, Wilson M. Compton, Andrew Hyland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

background Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use in the USA is increasing. As such, it is critical to understand who uses e-cigarettes, how e-cigarettes are used and what types of products are prevalent. This study assesses patterns of current e-cigarette use among daily and non-daily adult users in the 2013–2014 Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study. Methods We examined the proportion of current adult e-cigarette users (n=3642) reporting infrequent use (use on ‘some days’ and use on 0–2 of the past 30 days), moderate use (use on ‘some days’ and use on >2 of the past 30 days) and daily use. We examined demographic characteristics, use of other tobacco products and e-cigarette product characteristics overall and by use category. Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs) were calculated using Poisson regression to assess correlates of daily e-cigarette use. results Among the 5.5% of adult current e-cigarette users in the PATH Study, 42.2% reported infrequent use, 36.5% reported moderate use and 21.3% reported daily use. Cigarette smokers who quit in the past year were more likely to report daily e-cigarette use, compared with current smokers (aPR=3.21, 95% CI=2.75 to 3.76). Those who reported using rechargeable or refillable devices were more likely to report daily use compared with those who did not use these devices (aPR=1.95, 95% CI=1.44 to 2.65 and aPR=2.10, 95% CI=1.75 to 2.52, respectively). conclusions The majority of e-cigarette users in this study reported less than daily use. Compared with non-daily use, daily use was associated with being a former smoker; however, cross-sectional data limits our ability to establish the temporality or directionality of such associations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number053462
JournalTobacco control
Volume26
Issue numbere2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 30 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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    Coleman, B. N., Rostron, B., Johnson, S. E., Ambrose, B. K., Pearson, J., Stanton, C. A., Wang, B., Delnevo, C., Bansal-Travers, M., Kimmel, H. L., Goniewicz, M. L., Niaura, R., Abrams, D., Conway, K. P., Borek, N., Compton, W. M., & Hyland, A. (2017). Electronic cigarette use among US adults in the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study, 2013–2014. Tobacco control, 26(e2), [053462]. https://doi.org/10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2016-053462