Ethics and the study of carnivores: Doing science while respecting animals

Marc Bekoff, Dale Jamieson

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    The human relationship to nature is a deeply ambiguous one. Human animals are both a part of nature and distinct from it. They are part of nature in the sense that, like other forms of life, they were brought into existence by natural processes, and, like other forms of life, they are dependent on their environment for survival and success. Yet humans are also reflective animals with sophisticated cultural systems. Because of their immense power and their ability to wield it intentionally, humans have duties and responsibilities that other animals do not (Bekoff and Jamieson 1991).

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationAnimal Passions and Beastly Virtues
    Subtitle of host publicationReflections on Redecorating Nature
    PublisherTemple University Press
    Pages232-261
    Number of pages30
    ISBN (Print)9781592133482
    StatePublished - 2006

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
    • Environmental Science(all)

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