Ethnic invention: A new principle for institutional design in ethnically divided democracies

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Is it a good idea for Rwanda, with its history of violence between Hutus and Tutsis, to stop classifying citizens by ethnicity in its census? Is it appropriate for Nigeria, with its history of ethnic violence, to have a two-party instead of a multiparty system? Is Iraq, with its conflicts between Shias, Sunnis and Kurds, better off with a proportional rather than a first-past-the-post electoral system? Is it appropriate for the United States, with its history of racial conflict between a white majority and an African American minority, to institutionalize majority-minority electoral districts? Should Sri Lanka, with its long-standing civil war between Sinhalas and Tamils, recreate itself as a federal state?.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationDesigning Democratic Government
Subtitle of host publicationMaking Institutions Work
PublisherRussell Sage Foundation
Pages89-114
Number of pages26
ISBN (Electronic)9781610443500
ISBN (Print)9780871545183
StatePublished - 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

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  • Cite this

    Chandra, K. (2008). Ethnic invention: A new principle for institutional design in ethnically divided democracies. In Designing Democratic Government: Making Institutions Work (pp. 89-114). Russell Sage Foundation.