Evaluating objective and subjective quantitative parameters at the initial visit to predict future glaucomatous visual field progression

Allison K. Ungar, Gadi Wollstein, Hiroshi Ishikawa, Lindsey S. Folio, Yun Ling, Richard A. Bilonick, Robert J. Noecker, Juan Xu, Larry Kagemann, Cynthia Mattox, Joel S. Schuman

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    ■ BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the ability of structural assessment to predict glaucomatous visual field progression. ■ PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 119 healthy eyes with suspected glaucoma and glaucomatous eyes with 5 or more optic nerve stereophotographs, optical coherence tomography (OCT), and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (CSLO) all acquired within 6 months of each other were enrolled. Odds ratios to predict progression were determined by generalized estimating equation models. ■ RESULTS: Median follow-up was 4.0 years (range: 1.5 to 5.7 years). Fifteen eyes progressed by glaucoma progression analysis, 20 by visual field index, and 10 by both. Baseline parameters from stereophotographs (vertical cup-to-disc ratio and Disc Damage Likelihood Scale), OCT (global, superior quadrant, and inferior quadrant retinal nerve fiber layer thickness), and CSLO (cup shape measure and mean cup depth) were significant predictors of progression. Comparing the single best parameter from all models, only the OCT superior quadrant RNFL predicted progression. ■ CONCLUSION: Baseline stereophotographs, OCT, and CSLO measurements may be clinically useful to predict glaucomatous visual field progression.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)416-424
    Number of pages9
    JournalOphthalmic Surgery Lasers and Imaging
    Volume43
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Sep 2012

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Surgery
    • Ophthalmology

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