Examining the role of culture-specific coping as a predictor of resilient outcomes in African Americans from high-risk urban communities

Shawn O. Utsey, Mark A. Bolden, Yzette Lanier, Otis Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This investigation examined the role of culture-specific coping in relation to resilient outcomes in African Americans from high-risk urban communities. Participants (N = 385) were administered a survey questionnaire packet containing measures of culture-specific coping, traditional resilience factors (cognitive ability, social support, and familial factors), and resilient outcomes (physical, psychological, social, and environmental quality of life). Structural equation modeling was used to test the degree to which culture-specific coping would uniquely contribute to the prediction of quality of life above and beyond traditional predictive factors of resilience. Findings indicated that spiritual and collective coping were statistically significant predictors of quality of life outcomes above and beyond the traditional predictive factors. Overall, the findings indicated that both traditional and cultural factors were predictors of resilient outcomes (i.e., positive quality of life indicators) for African Americans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)75-93
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Black Psychology
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2007

Keywords

  • African American
  • Culture-specific coping
  • Resilience
  • Urbana

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anthropology
  • Applied Psychology

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