Extrinsic rewards, congruence between dispositions and behaviors, and perceived freedom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Tested the hypothesis that perceived freedom is a function of the probability that actors will behave in line with their dispositions. In 2 experiments, a total of 146 undergraduates received personality descriptions which implied that the actors were highly likely to possess particular personal dispositions. The probability of the actors' behaving in line with their dispositions was manipulated by varying the pattern of extrinsic rewards associated with the behavior alternatives. Specifically, the extrinsic rewards were either biased in favor of the behavior that was incongruent with the actors' dispositions, or unbiased. As intended, the probability of the actors' behaving in line with their dispositions was lowest in the 1st situation, intermediate in the 2nd situation, and highest in the 3rd situation. Furthermore, as predicted, results indicate the same ordering of these situations on perceived freedom. (21 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)588-597
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Personality and Social Psychology
Volume36
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1978

Keywords

  • behaviors, perceived freedom, college students
  • congruence vs incongruence of confederate's dispositions &
  • extrinsic rewards &

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Extrinsic rewards, congruence between dispositions and behaviors, and perceived freedom'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this