Factors Contributing to West Indian American Depression

Gregory A. Kanhai, Doris F. Chang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study explored factors that mediate the relationship between subjective wellbeing and depression in a sample of West Indian American immigrants. An intersectional theoretical framework was used to identify the relative contribution of psychological stressors—perceived discrimination, financial strain and acculturative stress—that mediate the relationship between subjective wellbeing and depression. A geographically diverse sample was recruited by an online survey (N = 255), consisting of 138 men, 115 women, 173 Indo-West Indians and 82 Afro-West Indians. Path analysis was used to identify the relative contribution of psychological stressors. Acculturative stress and financial strain were both statistically significant predictors of depression. Financial strain was identified as the major mediator between subjective wellbeing and depression in West Indian Americans. West Indian Americans are vulnerable to financial strain and acculturative stress. These sources of psychological stress are important contributors to depression in the community. More research is needed to clarify these relationships.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • Acculturative stress
  • Financial strain
  • Perceived discrimination
  • Subjective wellbeing
  • West Indian American

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Factors Contributing to West Indian American Depression'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this