Factors related to perceived diabetes control are not related to actual glucose control for minority patients with diabetes

Lisa M. McAndrew, Carol R. Horowitz, Kristie J. Lancaster, Howard Leventhal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE- To examine variables associated with perceived diabetes control compared with an objective measure of glucose control (A1C). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS- Beliefs about diabetes were assessed among 334 individuals with diabetes living in a primarily low-income, minority, urban neighborhood. Regression analyses tested associations between disease beliefs and both participants' perceptions of control and actual control (A1C). RESULTS- Poorer perceived diabetes control was associated with perceiving a greater impact of diabetes, greater depressive symptoms, not following a diabetic diet, A1C, and a trend toward less exercise. Variables associated with better actual control (A1C) included higher BMI, older age, and not using insulin. CONCLUSIONS- Patients' perceptions of their diabetes control are informed by subjective diabetes cues (e.g., perceived impact of diabetes and adherence to a diabetic diet), which are not related to A1C. Clinicians should take into account what cues patients are using to assess their diabetes control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)736-738
Number of pages3
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

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