Feasibility and acceptability of using information visualizations to improve HIV-related communication in a limited-resource setting: a short report

Samantha Stonbraker, Gabriella Flynn, Maureen George, Silvia Cunto-Amesty, Carmela Alcántara, Ana F. Abraído-Lanza, Mina Halpern, Tawandra Rowell-Cunsolo, Suzanne Bakken, Rebecca Schnall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Infographics (visualizations that present information) can assist clinicians to offer health information to patients with low health literacy in an accessible format. In response, we developed an infographic intervention to enhance clinical, HIV-related communication. This study reports on its feasibility and acceptability at a clinical setting in the Dominican Republic. We conducted in-depth interviews with physicians who administered the intervention and patients who received it. We conducted audio-recorded interviews in Spanish using semi-structured interview guides. Recordings were professionally transcribed verbatim then analyzed using descriptive content analysis. Physician transcripts were deductively coded according to constructs of Bowen et al.'s feasibility framework and patient transcripts were inductively coded. Three physicians and 26 patients participated. Feasibility constructs endorsed by physicians indicated that infographics were easy to use, improved teaching, and could easily be incorporated into their workflow. Coding of patient transcripts identified four categories that indicated the intervention was acceptable and useful, offered feedback regarding effective clinical communication, and recommended improvements to infographics. Taken together, these data indicate our intervention was a feasible and acceptable way to provide clinical, HIV-related information and provide important recommendations for future visualization design as well as effective clinical communication with similar patient populations.

Keywords

  • clinician-patient communication
  • feasibility
  • information visualization
  • nursing informatics
  • patient education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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