Feasibility of a computerized clinical decision support system for treating tobacco use in dental clinics

Theresa Montini, Andrew B. Schenkel, Donna R. Shelley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study tested the feasibility of using information technology to improve dentists' adherence to the Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence Clinical Practice Guidelines by offering a web-based computer-mediated clinical decision support system (CDSS) for tobacco use treatment in dental clinics. The authors developed a CDSS tool, deployed the software in one of New York University College of Dentistry's general practice clinics, interviewed associate student dentists, and reviewed a random selection of patients' charts to determine if, after implementation, there were changes in tobacco use screening and referral to treatment. Students reported that the CDSS was easy to use, increased their efficiency, and provided better quality of evidence than was available prior to the intervention. Chart reviews demonstrated that, after CDSS implementation, patients in the target clinic were significantly more likely to be screened for tobacco use (<0.001), and tobacco-using patients were more likely to be advised (<0.001), referred to the state's Quit Line (<0.001), and prescribed nicotine replacement therapy (0.035). This study concludes that it is feasible to implement a CDSS for tobacco use treatment in dental clinics. The CDSS is a promising method for improving adherence to tobacco use treatment guidelines and warrants further study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)458-462
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of dental education
Volume77
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jan 4 2013

Keywords

  • Clinical decision support system
  • Dental school clinic
  • Tobacco cessation
  • Tobacco counseling
  • Tobacco intervention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Dentistry(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Feasibility of a computerized clinical decision support system for treating tobacco use in dental clinics'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this