Federal Funding for Mixed Methods Research in the Health Sciences in the United States: Recent Trends

Caitlin E. Coyle, Dena Schulman-Green, Shelli Feder, Sinem Toraman, Margaret L. Prust, Vicki L. Plano Clark, Leslie Curry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although investigators in health sciences are increasingly interested in using mixed methods, greater adoption requires funding opportunities. Funding allocations can signal recognition of a particular methodology and proficiency of investigators in using such methods. We examined trends in prevalence of mixed methods research funded by federal agencies in the United States. We reviewed abstracts to describe the content and terminology related to mixed methods. The number of self-identified mixed methods awards (n = 535; 2009-2014) increased modestly from previous trends (n = 226; 1997-2008). Abstracts were highly variable in their depth of description and use of mixed methods terminology. We propose five elements to address when developing a scientific abstract for a mixed methods study to facilitate clear description of study design and methods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)305-324
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Mixed Methods Research
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2018

Keywords

  • funding
  • health sciences
  • mixed methods
  • study abstracts
  • terminology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Statistics, Probability and Uncertainty

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