Framing economic inequality and policy as group disadvantages (versus group advantages) spurs support for action

Pia Dietze, Maureen A. Craig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Given the near-historic levels of economic inequality in the United States, it is vital to understand when and why people are motivated to reduce it. We examine whether the manner in which economic inequality and policy are framed—in terms of either upper-socio-economic-class advantages or lower-socio-economic-class disadvantages—influences individuals’ reactions to inequality. Across five studies, framing redistributive policy (Study 1) as disadvantage-reducing (versus advantage-reducing) and economic inequality (Studies 2–5) as lower-class disadvantages (versus upper-class advantages or a control frame) enhances support for action to reduce inequality. Moreover, increased support is partly driven by perceptions that inequality is more unjust if framed as lower-class disadvantages. Using diverse methodologies (for example, social media engagement on Facebook) and nationally representative samples of self-reported upper-class and lower-class individuals, this work suggests that the ways in which economic inequality is communicated (for example, by the media) may reliably influence people’s reactions to and concern for the issue.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)349-360
Number of pages12
JournalNature human behaviour
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Framing economic inequality and policy as group disadvantages (versus group advantages) spurs support for action'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this