HCI, natural science and design: a framework for triangulation across disciplines

Wendy E. Mackay, Anne Laure Fayard

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

    Abstract

    Human-computer interaction is multidisciplinary, drawing paradigms and techniques from both the natural sciences and the design disciplines. HCI cannot be considered a pure natural science because it studies the interaction between people and artifically-created artifacts, rather than naturally-occurring phenomena, which violates several basic assumptions of natural science. Similarly, HCI cannot be considered a pure design discipline because it strives to independently verify design decisions and processes, and borrows many values from scientists. The purpose of this paper is to provide a simple framework that describes how the research and design models underlying HCI can be integrated. We explore the relationships among these approaches in the context of a particular research site, CENA, the Centre d' Etudes de la Navigation Aerienne, and illustrate how the various disciplines can contribute to a complex design problem: improving the interface to the French air traffic control system.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages223-234
    Number of pages12
    StatePublished - 1997
    EventProceedings of the 1997 2nd Biannual Conference on Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, and Techniques, DIS'97 - Amsterdam, Neth
    Duration: Aug 18 1997Aug 20 1997

    Other

    OtherProceedings of the 1997 2nd Biannual Conference on Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, and Techniques, DIS'97
    CityAmsterdam, Neth
    Period8/18/978/20/97

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Control and Systems Engineering

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