Health Technology-Enabled Interventions for Adherence Support and Retention in Care Among US HIV-Infected Adolescents and Young Adults: An Integrative Review

Ann Margaret Dunn Navarra, Marya Viorst Gwadz, Robin Whittemore, Suzanne R. Bakken, Charles M. Cleland, Winslow Burleson, Susan Kaplan Jacobs, Gail D’Eramo Melkus

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

The objective of this integrative review was to describe current US trends for health technology-enabled adherence interventions among behaviorally HIV-infected youth (ages 13–29 years), and present the feasibility and efficacy of identified interventions. A comprehensive search was executed across five electronic databases (January 2005–March 2016). Of the 1911 identified studies, nine met the inclusion criteria of quantitative or mixed methods design, technology-enabled adherence and or retention intervention for US HIV-infected youth. The majority were small pilots. Intervention dose varied between studies applying similar technology platforms with more than half not informed by a theoretical framework. Retention in care was not a reported outcome, and operationalization of adherence was heterogeneous across studies. Despite these limitations, synthesized findings from this review demonstrate feasibility of computer-based interventions, and initial efficacy of SMS texting for adherence support among HIV-infected youth. Moving forward, there is a pressing need for the expansion of this evidence base.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3154-3171
Number of pages18
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume21
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017

Keywords

  • Adherence
  • Cell phones
  • HIV
  • Patient compliance
  • Retention in HIV care
  • Smartphone
  • Technology
  • Text messaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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