High mental disorder rates are based on invalid measures: Questions about the claimed ubiquity of mutation-induced dysfunction

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Three reservations about Keller & Miller's (K&M's) argument are explored: Serious validity problems afflict epidemiological criteria discriminating disorders from non-disorders, so high rates may be misleading. Normal variation need not be mild disorder, contrary to a possible interpretation of K&M's article. And, rather than mutation-selection balance, true disorders may result from unselected combinations of normal variants over many loci.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)424-426
Number of pages3
JournalBehavioral and Brain Sciences
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Physiology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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