Hostility in smokers with past major depressive disorder: Relation to smoking patterns, reasons for quitting, and cessation outcomes

Christopher W. Kahler, David R. Strong, Raymond Niaura, Richard A. Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We examined trait hostility in 85 participants in a clinical trial of cessation treatment for smokers with a history of major depressive disorder. Consistent with hypotheses, trait hostility, as indexed by the Cook-Medley Hostility Scale, was associated with greater smoking in social situations, greater expectations of being evaluated negatively by others because of smoking, and stronger extrinsic social reasons for quitting. Greater hostility was associated with significantly lower odds of smoking abstinence after treatment. Hostility was not associated significantly with smoking to manage negative affect, nor did it predict change in negative mood during treatment. Results suggest hostility may play an important role in smoking motivation and cessation outcomes among smokers with past major depression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)809-818
Number of pages10
JournalNicotine and Tobacco Research
Volume6
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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