How can the nursing profession help reduce sexual and gender minority related health disparities: Recommendations from the national nursing LGBTQ health summit

Tonda L. Hughes, Kasey Jackman, Caroline Dorsen, Cynthia Arslanian-Engoren, Lauren Ghazal, Thomas Christenberry-deceased, Chris Coleman, Melissa Mackin, Scott Emory Moore, Ronica Mukerjee, Athena Sherman, Sheila Smith, Rachel Walker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) people, also commonly referred to as sexual and gender minorities (SGMs), live in every part of the United States and encompass all races and/or ethnicities, religions, and social classes. Major reports from various sources document higher rates of health issues (e.g., substance abuse, depression, suicidality, cardiovascular disease) among SGMs than heterosexuals. Chronic stress related to marginalization and discrimination is a key contributor to these disparities. The nursing profession has paid relatively little attention to SGM health issues. Purpose and Methods: To address these gaps, the first National Nursing LGBTQ Health Summit brought together nursing deans, leaders of national nursing organizations, and other participants from across the United States. Discussion: Participants agreed that increasing SGM-specific content in nursing curricula, practice guidelines, faculty development, and research is necessary to improve the health of SGM people. Conclusion: The Summit ended with a call to action for the nursing profession to prioritize SGM health through innovations in education, research, and practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalNursing outlook
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • Health summit
  • LGBTQ
  • Nursing
  • Sexual and gender minority
  • SGM

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

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