Human Trafficking of Children: Nurse Practitioner Knowledge, Beliefs, and Experience Supporting the Development of a Practice Guideline: Part One

Jessica L. Peck, Mikki Meadows-Oliver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Up to 87% of trafficking victims encounter a health care provider while being trafficked but are not recognized as victims. Most health care providers receive little or no training, and awareness remains low. To describe the knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes of pediatric advanced practice registered nurses about human trafficking. Method: A survey of the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners membership (n = 8,647) before the intervention measured knowledge, beliefs, and experience regarding child trafficking. An awareness campaign was implemented with continuing education, national media presence, Train the Trainer programs, and creation of a nonprofit organization to direct strategic initiatives. Results: Overall, 799 (9%) NAPNAP members completed the survey. Although 87% believed it possible that they might encounter a victim of trafficking in their practice, 35% were unsure if they had provided care for a victim. Only 24% reported confidence in their ability to identify a child at risk for trafficking. Discussion: These survey findings indicate the need for clinical practice guidelines to identify potential and actual victims of human trafficking. Pediatric advanced practice registered nurses are ideally equipped and situated to intervene on behalf of vulnerable children with health disparities in a myriad of care settings, advocating for prevention and optimization of equitable health outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)603-611
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Pediatric Health Care
Volume33
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2019

Keywords

  • Child trafficking
  • labor trafficking
  • nurse practitioner
  • sex trafficking
  • vulnerable

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Human Trafficking of Children: Nurse Practitioner Knowledge, Beliefs, and Experience Supporting the Development of a Practice Guideline: Part One'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this