Hypothermia differentially increases extracellular signal-regulated kinase and stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun terminal kinase activation in the hippocampus during reperfusion after asphyxial cardiac arrest

S. D. Hicks, K. T. Parmele, D. B. Defranco, E. Klann, C. W. Callaway

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Mitogen-activated protein kinases are signal transduction mediators that have been implicated in cell survival and cell death. This study characterized the activation of pathways in the hippocampus during reperfusion after global cerebral ischemia, as well as the influence of a regimen of hypothermia that reduces ischemic cell death in the hippocampus. Circulatory arrest was induced in rats by 8min of asphyxia. Relative levels of phosphorylated and total extracellular signal-regulated kinase, stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase were measured in the hippocampus after 6, 12 or 24h of reperfusion using immunoblotting. Asphyxia induced a progressive increase in phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase and stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase, but no change in phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Induction of mild hypothermia (33°C) during reperfusion increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation and produced a smaller increase in stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation at 24h. Hypothermia did not alter extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation in rats not subjected to ischemia. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation was associated with an increase in phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2, and was inhibited by administration of the specific mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 inhibitor SL327. Immunohistochemical staining showed an increase in active extracellular signal-regulated kinase in the CA1, CA2, CA3 and dentate gyrus regions of the hippocampus after ischemia and reperfusion. In contrast, active stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase immunoreactivity was most intense in the CA3 and dentate gyrus regions.These data demonstrate that both extracellular signal-regulated kinase and stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathways are activated during the first 24h of reperfusion after global cerebral ischemia, and that hypothermia increases the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase relative to stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase. Thus, an increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation may be associated with improved neuronal survival after ischemic injury. Copyright (C) 2000 IBRO.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)677-685
Number of pages9
JournalNeuroscience
Volume98
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2000

Keywords

  • Heart arrest
  • Hippocampus
  • Hypothermia
  • MAPK
  • Phosphorylation
  • Transient cerebral ischemia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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