“If They Give Their Mind to HIV, They Don’t Last as Long”: An Explanatory Model of HIV Infection in a Limited-Resource Setting Informs Person-Centered Care

Samantha Stonbraker, Gabriella Sanabria, Silvia Cunto-Amesty, Carmela Alcántara, Ana F. Abraído-Lanza, Tawandra Rowell-Cunsolo, Mina Halpern, Suzanne Bakken, Rebecca Schnall, Maureen George

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Explanatory models describe individuals’ perceptions of their illness experiences, which can guide culturally relevant care. We constructed an explanatory model of the experience of living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the Dominican Republic. Following qualitative descriptive methodology, we conducted interviews in Spanish using a semi-structured interview guide developed using Kleinman’s explanatory model framework. Two bilingual researchers coded interview transcripts following conventional content analysis. We used deductive codes from Kleinman’s framework and inductive codes external to the framework to construct the codebook. We arranged codes by shared meaning into categories and constructed themes that reflected shared findings from inductive categories and deductive codes. Twenty-six persons living with HIV participated. They provided rich descriptions of their experiences represented by four cross-cutting themes, which informed the explanatory model. By incorporating this in-depth understanding of patients’ illness experiences into care delivery, nurses can cultivate culturally meaningful and trusting patient-centered partnerships that improve health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalGlobal Qualitative Nursing Research
Volume9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022

Keywords

  • Caribbean
  • Dominican Republic
  • explanatory model
  • health beliefs
  • HIV
  • person-centered care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

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