Illness-related support and negative network interactions: Effects on HIV-infected men's depressive symptomatology

Karolynn Siegel, Victoria H. Raveis, Daniel Karus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Data collected as part of a psychosocial study of gay and bisexual men's experiences of living with HIV infection as a chronic illness were examined to investigate the psychological impact of the perceived availability of illness-related support and negative illness-related network interactions in a sample of men from this population. The sample was comprised of 144 HIV-infected non-Hispanic white, African American, and Puerto Rican men living in the New York City metropolitan area. Analyses found evidence of a conjoint (interactive) effect between perceived support and negative network interactions. There was no evidence of either perceived availability of illness-related network support buffering or negative illness-related network interactions amplifying the effect of HIV/AIDS-related physical symptomatology on depressive symptomatology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)395-420
Number of pages26
JournalAmerican journal of community psychology
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997

Keywords

  • Depressive symptomatology
  • Gay men
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Applied Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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