Imaging with multimodal adaptive-optics optical coherence tomography in multiple evanescent white dot syndrome: The structure and functional relationship

Leanne T. Labriola, Andrew D. Legarreta, John E. Legarreta, Zach Nadler, Denise Gallagher, Daniel X. Hammer, R. Daniel Ferguson, Nicusor Iftimia, Gadi Wollstein, Joel S. Schuman

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Purpose: To elucidate the location of pathological changes in multiple evanescent white dot syndrome (MEWDS) with the use of multimodal adaptive optics (AO) imaging. Methods: A 5-year observational case study of a 24-year-old female with recurrent MEWDS. Full examination included history, Snellen chart visual acuity, pupil assessment, intraocular pressures, slit lamp evaluation, dilated fundoscopic exam, imaging with Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT), blue-light fundus autofluorescence (FAF), fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, and adaptive-optics optical coherence tomography. Results: Three distinct acute episodes of MEWDS occurred during the period of follow-up. Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography and adaptive-optics imaging showed disturbance in the photoreceptor outer segments (PR OS) in the posterior pole with each flare. The degree of disturbance at the photoreceptor level corresponded to size and extent of the visual field changes. All findings were transient with delineation of the photoreceptor recovery from the outer edges of the lesion inward. Hyperautofluorescence was seen during acute flares. Increase in choroidal thickness did occur with each active flare but resolved. Conclusion: Although changes in the choroid and RPE can be observed in MEWDS, Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography, and multimodal adaptive optics imaging localized the visually significant changes seen in this disease at the level of the photoreceptors. These transient retinal changes specifically occur at the level of the inner segment ellipsoid and OS/RPE line. En face optical coherence tomography imaging provides a detailed, yet noninvasive method for following the convalescence of MEWDS and provides insight into the structural and functional relationship of this transient inflammatory retinal disease.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)302-309
    Number of pages8
    JournalRetinal Cases and Brief Reports
    Volume10
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2016

    Keywords

    • Adaptive-optics
    • Autofluorescence
    • C-scan
    • Dot
    • Evanescent
    • Imaging
    • MEWDS
    • Multiple
    • Syndrome
    • White

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Ophthalmology

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  • Cite this

    Labriola, L. T., Legarreta, A. D., Legarreta, J. E., Nadler, Z., Gallagher, D., Hammer, D. X., Ferguson, R. D., Iftimia, N., Wollstein, G., & Schuman, J. S. (2016). Imaging with multimodal adaptive-optics optical coherence tomography in multiple evanescent white dot syndrome: The structure and functional relationship. Retinal Cases and Brief Reports, 10(4), 302-309. https://doi.org/10.1097/ICB.0000000000000271