Impact of race on survival in patients with clinically nonmetastatic prostate cancer who deferred primary treatment

Michael Koscuiszka, David Hatcher, Paul J. Christos, Amy E. Rose, Holly S. Greenwald, Ya Lin Chiu, Samir S. Taneja, Madhu Mazumdar, Peng Lee, Iman Osman

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer (PCa) racial disparity studies typically focus on survival differences after curative treatment. The authors of this report hypothesized that comparing mortality rates between African American (AA) and Caucasian American (CA) patients who deferred primary treatment for clinically nonmetastatic PCa may provide a better assessment of the impact of race on the natural course of PCa. METHODS: The pathology database of the New York Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC), an equal access-of-care facility, was searched for patients with biopsy-proven PCa. Inclusion criteria included 1) no evidence of metastatic disease or death within 3 years after diagnosis, 2) no primary treatment, and 3) a minimum of 5 years of follow-up for survivors. RESULTS: In total, 518 patients met inclusion criteria between 1990 and 2005. AA patients were younger (P=.02) and had higher median prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels (P=.001) at the time of diagnosis compared with CA patients. In a multivariate model, higher Gleason score and PSA level were associated with increased mortality (P=.001 and P=.03, respectively), but race was not a predictor of death from PCa. CONCLUSIONS: The current data suggested that race did not have a major impact on survival in patients with PCa who deferred primary treatment for clinically nonmetastatic disease.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)3145-3152
    Number of pages8
    JournalCancer
    Volume118
    Issue number12
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jun 15 2012

    Keywords

    • Nonmetastatic
    • Prostate cancer
    • Race
    • Surveillance
    • Survival

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Oncology
    • Cancer Research

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