Independent and combined relationships of perceived neighborhood social cohesion and physical frailty on functional disability in community-dwelling older adults

Boqin Xie, Chenjuan Ma, Junqiao Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Functional disability and physical frailty (PF) are debilitating geriatric conditions. Previous studies have suggested both perceived neighborhood social cohesion (PNSC) and PF can influence functional disability and may have an interactive effect too. This cross-sectional study aims to examine the independent and combined relationships of PF and PNSC on functional disability in community-dwelling older adults in Shanghai, China. A total of 1616 older adults aged 75 years were recruited using multistage sampling. Results showed that prefrailty, frailty (using the modified frailty phenotype criteria), and low PNSC (measured by the Neighborhood Cohesion Scale) were independently associated with increased likelihood of functional disability after adjustment of covariates. To evaluate the combined relationships of PF and PNSC, participants were classified into six groups based on their levels of PF and PNSC. The probability of frail older adults with low PNSC having functional disability stood out compared with the robust older adults with high PNSC. Our findings suggest the importance of high PNSC as a protective factor of maintaining functional ability. Future longitudinal studies are needed to identify the role of PNSC in the development of functional disability among frail older adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number5912
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume17
Issue number16
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2 2020

Keywords

  • Functional disability
  • Healthy aging
  • Perceived neighborhood social cohesion
  • Physical frailty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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