Individual Differences in the Activation and Control of Affective Race Bias as Assessed by Startle Eyeblink Response and Self-Report

David M. Amodio, Eddie Harmon-Jones, Patricia G. Devine

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

The activation and control of affective race bias were measured using startle eyeblink responses (Study 1) and self-reports (Study 2) as White American participants viewed White and Black faces. Individual differences in levels of bias were predicted using E. A. Plant and P. G. Devine's (1998) Internal and External Motivation to Respond Without Prejudice scales (IMS/EMS). Among high-IMS participants, those low in EMS exhibited less affective race bias in their blink responses than other participants. In contrast, both groups of high-IMS participants exhibited less affective race bias in self-reported responses compared with low-IMS participants. Results demonstrate individual differences in implicit affective race bias and suggest that controlled, belief-based processes are more effectively implemented in deliberative responses (e.g., self-reports).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)738-753
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of personality and social psychology
Volume84
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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