Influence of scary beliefs about the Tuskegee Syphilis Study on willingness to participate in research.

Jenna L. Davis, B. Lee Green, Ralph V. Katz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To assess whether scary/alarming beliefs about details on the Tuskegee Syphilis Study (TSS) are associated with willingness and/or fear to participate in biomedical research. Scary beliefs about TSS were examined for 565 Black and White adults who had heard of the TSS. Multivariate analyses by race were used to measure association. No association between scary beliefs and willingness or fear to participate in research was found (P > 0.05). These findings provide additional evidence that awareness or detailed knowledge about the TSS does not appear today to be a major factor influencing Blacks' willingness to participate in research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)59-62
Number of pages4
JournalThe ABNF journal : official journal of the Association of Black Nursing Faculty in Higher Education, Inc
Volume23
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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