Innate immunity in HIV-1 infection: Epithelial and non-specific host factors of mucosal immunity- a workshop report

W. Nittayananta, A. Weinberg, D. Malamud, D. Moyes, J. Webster-Cyriaque, S. Ghosh

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    The interplay between HIV-1 and epithelial cells represents a critical aspect in mucosal HIV-1 transmission. Epithelial cells lining the oral cavity cover subepithelial tissues, which contain virus-susceptible host cells including CD4+ T lymphocytes, monocytes/macrophages, and dendritic cells. Oral epithelia are among the sites of first exposure to both cell-free and cell-associated virus HIV-1 through breast-feeding and oral-genital contact. However, oral mucosa is considered to be naturally resistant to HIV-1 transmission. Oral epithelial cells have been shown to play a crucial role in innate host defense. Nevertheless, it is not clear to what degree these local innate immune factors contribute to HIV-1 resistance of the oral mucosa.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)171-180
    Number of pages10
    JournalOral Diseases
    Volume22
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

    Keywords

    • AIDS
    • Epithelial cell
    • HIV
    • Innate immunity
    • Mucosa
    • Oral

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Otorhinolaryngology
    • General Dentistry

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