Integrating condom skills into family-centered prevention: Efficacy of the strong african american families-teen program

Steven M. Kogan, Tianyi Yu, Gene H. Brody, Yi Fu Chen, Ralph J. Diclemente, Gina M. Wingood, Phaedra S. Corso

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: The Strong African American Families-Teen (SAAF-T) program, a family-centered preventive intervention that included an optional condom skills unit, was evaluated to determine whether it prevented unprotected intercourse and increased condom efficacy among rural African American adolescents. Ancillary analyses were conducted to identify factors that predicted youth attendance of the condom skills unit. Methods: Sixteen-year-old African American youths (N = 502) and their primary caregivers were randomly assigned to SAAF-T (n = 252) or an attention control (n = 250) intervention. SAAF-T families participated in a 5-week family skills training program that included an optional condom skills unit. All families completed in-home pretest, posttest, and long-term follow-up interviews during which adolescents reported on their sexual behavior, condom use, and condom efficacy. Because condom use was addressed only in an optional unit that required caregiver consent, we analyzed efficacy using complier average causal effect analyses. Results: Attendance in both SAAF-T and the attention control intervention averaged 4 of 5 sessions; 70% of SAAF-T youth attended the condom skills unit. Complier average causal effect models indicated that SAAF-T was efficacious in reducing unprotected intercourse and increasing condom efficacy among rural African American high school students. Exploratory analyses indicated that religious caregivers were more likely than nonreligious caregivers to have their youth attend the condom skills unit. Conclusions: Results suggest that brief condom skills educational modules in the context of a family-centered program are feasible and reduce risk for sexually transmitted infections and unplanned pregnancies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)164-170
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume51
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2012

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • African American
  • Condom efficacy
  • Condom skills
  • Primary prevention
  • Sexual behaviors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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