Interest in an Ebola vaccine among a U.S. national sample during the height of the 2014–2016 Ebola outbreak in West Africa

Julia E. Painter, Ralph J. DiClemente, Michael E. von Fricken

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

To better understand the association between Ebola-related attitudes and interest in receiving an Ebola virus vaccine, a survey was administered to a U.S. national sample using GfK's KnowledgePanel®. Among participants (N = 1417), 34.1% expressed interest in an Ebola vaccine for themselves. In the subset of participants with children aged 0–17 (N = 410), 38.1% expressed interest in an Ebola vaccine for their child. In multivariable analyses, vaccine interest for oneself was associated with perceived susceptibility to Ebola (p = 0.009), beliefs that the U.S. government should spend money to control Ebola (p = 0.002), and beliefs Ebola posed a national threat (p = 0.007). Vaccine interest for one's child was associated with perceived severity of Ebola (p = 0.018) and beliefs that the U.S. government should spend money to control Ebola (p = 0.003). Findings highlight the influence of personal and national threat beliefs on vaccine interest. Understanding the impact of threat beliefs may benefit vaccine campaign development during future pandemic threats.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)508-512
Number of pages5
JournalVaccine
Volume35
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 23 2017

Keywords

  • Acceptability
  • Attitudes
  • Ebola
  • Interest
  • Vaccine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • veterinary(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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