Interventions to reduce alcohol use among HIV-Infected individuals: A review and critique of the literature

Jennifer L. Brown, Kelly S. Demartini, Jessica M. Sales, Andrea L. Swartzendruber, Ralph J. Diclemente

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Alcohol use disorders are common among HIV-infected individuals and are associated with adverse physiological complications and increased engagement in other health risk behaviors. This paper provides a review and critique of interventions to reduce alcohol use among HIV-infected individuals, including a: (a) synthesis of core intervention components and trial designs; (b) summary of intervention efficacy to reduce alcohol use outcomes; and (c) methodological critique and guidance for future research. We reviewed 14 behavioral interventions that reported on alcohol use outcomes among HIV-infected individuals. Findings were mixed for intervention efficacy to reduce alcohol frequency and quantity. There was limited evidence that interventions reduced binge drinking frequency or alcohol abuse or dependence symptoms. Despite the prevalence of disordered alcohol use among HIV-infected individuals, there is lack of efficacious intervention approaches. Efficacious intervention approaches to reduce alcohol use among HIV-infected individuals are urgently needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)356-370
Number of pages15
JournalCurrent HIV/AIDS Reports
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2013

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Alcohol interventions
  • Behavioral aspects of HIV management
  • HIV
  • HIV-infected
  • HIV-positive

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

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